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SubjectSNES Rom Dumping? new Reply to this message
Posted byunknownsou
Posted on05/13/05 11:40 PM



So I've got some Super Nintendo games that I wanna backup... what hardware do I need to do it and where can I get it?


SubjectDepends on the game new Reply to this message
Posted byRoushiMSX
Posted on05/14/05 00:53 AM



Most of them you could dump pretty easilly with a Super Wildcard or something similar. the Game Doctor SF7 is popular, too. tons of info on copiers can be found here.

Personally, I use a Super Wildcard DX2 64mb (along with ucon64)and love it. The original reason i bought it was to play translated games on my SNES and TV (in particular, Tales of Phantasia...though it wasn't translated yet, so i spent a lot of time playing Umihara Kawase :( ), and it has served its purpose quite well.




SubjectRe: Depends on the game new Reply to this message
Posted byMrClick
Posted on05/14/05 07:36 AM



For the purpose of backing up a card to play it on an emulator you are fine with even a cheap and simple backup unit.

My first machine was a Super Pro Fighter from CCL with just 16 megabits of memory to store a game, but I was able to dump even the biggest and newest games onto up to 4 1.6 meg disk and then join them together with a programm like ucon64 to get an image that worked in Zsnes.

The problem starts with wanting to play the games from disk. First of all the memory of the machine must be big enough to hold the game. With 32 megabits your good for every game but Tales of Phantasia (it's 6 megabytes). Then it depends on the additional chips inside the copier. SuperFX games won't run on most machines. I never got them to run on my Super WildCard DX 32. DSP games like to loockup or don't even run at all. Some games even sport a more or less powerful protextion against being used in a backup unit. While Killer Instinct runs perfectly from disk on my WildCard it displays a "don't play this on a copier, copiers are illegal" message when play directly from the card through the WildCard.

So if you just want to backup your fine, if you want to play the backups on the copier you might run into bigger problems.

Try your local flea markets or second hand gaming stores for backups sytsems. I'm quite sure that they got banned from eBay, but you can try. I bet you will still find some units on Hong Kong markets so there might be some import sites on the net who cary a limited amount.
You better check the list on the page RoushiMSX provided when you consider to buy a specific copier. I guess it is no shame to spend more than 100$ on a WildCard DX or DX2 maybe even 200$ but some copiers (especially the early 90s ones) aren't really worth that kind of money compared to the features they provide.

By the way does anybody know if the WildCard DX2 32 can be upgraded to 64 Mb? I might consider it if it ain't to exensive.


SubjectRe: Depends on the game new Reply to this message
Posted byclem
Posted on05/14/05 08:48 AM



I once had an undumped SNES cart (I think some Asterix game?) - sent it to Badge and he dumped and released it

clem

> For the purpose of backing up a card to play it on an emulator you are fine with
> even a cheap and simple backup unit.
>
> My first machine was a Super Pro Fighter from CCL with just 16 megabits of
> memory to store a game, but I was able to dump even the biggest and newest games
> onto up to 4 1.6 meg disk and then join them together with a programm like
> ucon64 to get an image that worked in Zsnes.
>
> The problem starts with wanting to play the games from disk. First of all the
> memory of the machine must be big enough to hold the game. With 32 megabits your
> good for every game but Tales of Phantasia (it's 6 megabytes). Then it depends
> on the additional chips inside the copier. SuperFX games won't run on most
> machines. I never got them to run on my Super WildCard DX 32. DSP games like to
> loockup or don't even run at all. Some games even sport a more or less powerful
> protextion against being used in a backup unit. While Killer Instinct runs
> perfectly from disk on my WildCard it displays a "don't play this on a copier,
> copiers are illegal" message when play directly from the card through the
> WildCard.
>
> So if you just want to backup your fine, if you want to play the backups on the
> copier you might run into bigger problems.
>
> Try your local flea markets or second hand gaming stores for backups sytsems.
> I'm quite sure that they got banned from eBay, but you can try. I bet you will
> still find some units on Hong Kong markets so there might be some import sites
> on the net who cary a limited amount.
> You better check the list on the page RoushiMSX provided when you consider to
> buy a specific copier. I guess it is no shame to spend more than 100$ on a
> WildCard DX or DX2 maybe even 200$ but some copiers (especially the early 90s
> ones) aren't really worth that kind of money compared to the features they
> provide.
>
> By the way does anybody know if the WildCard DX2 32 can be upgraded to 64 Mb? I
> might consider it if it ain't to exensive.
>



SubjectRe: Depends on the game new Reply to this message
Posted byRoushiMSX
Posted on05/14/05 04:33 PM



megabytes). Then it depends
> on the additional chips inside the copier. SuperFX games won't run on most
> machines. I never got them to run on my Super WildCard DX 32. DSP games like to
> loockup or don't even run at all. Some games even sport a more or less powerful
> protextion against being used in a backup unit. While Killer Instinct runs
> perfectly from disk on my WildCard it displays a "don't play this on a copier,
> copiers are illegal" message when play directly from the card through the
> WildCard.
>

To play SuperFX games, you need a cart with a SFX chip in it that matches the game you're playing and you need to connect pin 1 on the actual SWCDX2 unit (crack it open and do some quick solder work). DSP games don't require the solder work, but they do require a DSP game with the same chip as the game you're trying to play..

> By the way does anybody know if the WildCard DX2 32 can be upgraded to 64 Mb? I
> might consider it if it ain't to exensive.
>

Yea, you can order memory upgrades for it, but i don't remember how much it was.




SubjectRe: Depends on the game new Reply to this message
Posted byMrClick
Posted on05/14/05 08:02 PM



Thanks for the info, RoushiMSX.

When you say I need a cardridge with a chip matching the one the game was fitted with, how big was the difference between the chips. Were there different revisions of SuperFX or DSP chips except the DSP1/DSP2 and SuperFX/SuperFX 2 issues.

I have a Starfox/Starwing card for SuperFX and a Mario Kart for DSP. I knopw there were games with something like a DSP2, an enhanced DSP. And I know that Star Fox 2 was going to use the SuperFX 2. Then there's that Capcom decompression chip on Mega Man X 2 and 3 and Street Fighter Alpha 2.
If I wanted to get a mostly complete collection of SNES chip cardridges, what games should I get. In other words: which SuperFX card do I need to play Dirt Trax?

Did anybody ever find out why the one pin is not connected in most copiers. It seems to be a common nuisance that you have to reconnect it by yourself. I had to do it on both of my copiers and many people who want to play SuperFX games on copiers hit the same problem.


SubjectThere's quite a few different chips new Reply to this message
Posted byRoushiMSX
Posted on05/14/05 08:33 PM



I've actually never screwed with Capcom's C4 chip, so I'm really not sure about the compatibility with those games. Never messed with SDD-1 either (Star Ocean, SFZ2, etc), though I'd love to see someone find a way to make that translation work with a game copier.

With the DSP chips there's 4 different revisions so you may need to have a couple of different carts, depending on what you want to play. I know the DSP-1b is supposed to be the best (found in Ballz) because it's a bug fixed version of the DSP-1a, which is a bugfixed version of the DSP-1. DSP-2, 3, and 4 aren't that common and were really limited (Only Top Gear 3000 used DSP-4, Only Dungeon Master used DSP-2, and some Gundam game used DSP-3).

SuperFX stuff is a bit simpler. Starfox 1.0 used the earliest version (Mario Chip 1), later revisions used the next version of Mario Chip 1. The other SuperFX games used a different chip (GSU-1), and then afaik SuperFX2 stuff all use the same chip (GSU-2).

Don't recall screwing with any other chips...so...hope that helps a little bit.




SubjectHere's my old copier/dumper Reply to this message
Posted byJohnick
Posted on05/15/05 08:41 AM



You need one of these



In the bottom right hand corner. Its a 16mb Super Pro Fighter. Thats an old Art of Fighting (US) cart in the top. Pitty my copier doesnt work anymore (doesnt matter seeing as i dont have a snes anymore).


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